At Large  December 17, 2021  Anna Claire Mauney

11 Favorite Artworks & Objects Covered in 2021

Created: Fri, 12/17/2021 - 09:00
Author: anna

Before our annual "Best 2021 Articles" list, we wanted to share some of our favorite artworks that we covered in 2021. These artworks and objects kept our team engaged in and excited about the art world and the daily work of covering it for our dear readers.

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Wikimedia Commons
	Gabriel von Max, Monkeys as Judges of Art, 1889. Oil on canvas. Bavarian State Painting Collections.
"Monkeys as Judges of Art"
Gabriel von Max, Monkeys as Judges of Art, 1889. Oil on canvas. Bavarian State Painting Collections.

This artwork was covered briefly in the feature story Artists vs Art Critics: An Age-Old Combative Yet Symbiotic Relationship. And yet, it left a lasting impression on the team. As a platform that does publish critical reviews, it seems important to cultivate humility and maintain a sense of humor.

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© 2016 KAT TORONTO/MISS MEATFACE.
Miss Meatface, Domestic Dame, 2016.
"Domestic Dame"
Miss Meatface, Domestic Dame, 2016.

Kat Toronto’s photograph as Miss Meatface was covered in the story 7 Queens Who Illustrate the Art of Drag. Though the team found this artwork striking in and of itself, the artist’s determination to challenge “notions of feminine beauty and body, tilting and prodding questions of dominance and objectification” made it truly unforgettable.

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COLLECTION OF THE DALÍ MUSEUM, ST. PETERSBURG, FL.
Dalí, Pisum sensuale (Cobea), from the FlorDalí series. 1968. Photolithograph and engraving.
"Pisum sensuale"
Salvador Dalí, Pisum sensuale (Cobea), from the FlorDalí series. 1968. Photolithograph and engraving.

This artwork was covered in the story Salvador Dalí's Surrealist Plants at Denver Botanic Gardens. We liked this work so much because it distills one of Dalí’s favorite symbols—the eye. Additionally, as a work on paper, it feels more intimate and perhaps even accessible than many of the artist’s other creations.

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COURTESY THE ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO.
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, At the Moulin Rouge, 1892 - 95. Oil on Canvas. The Art Institute of Chicago.
"At the Moulin Rouge"
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, At the Moulin Rouge, 1892 - 95. Oil on Canvas. The Art Institute of Chicago.

This Toulouse-Lautrec painting was covered in the story Green in the 19th Century: A Cultural History. This sublimely beautiful painting fully embodies the manner in which green began to signify the “dualities of inspiration and melancholia” during this era.

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© ROBERT DOISNEAU/GAMMA RAPHO.
Robert Doisneau, Un regard oblique, Paris, 1948.
"Un regard oblique"

Robert Doisneau, Un regard oblique, Paris, 1948.

Featured in Robert Doisneau is the Fisherman of Moments at Palazzo Roverella, we thought this photograph captured the mischief of Doisneau—a personal favorite artist of some of the team.

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Courtesy of Maison Boucheron and Florent Bonadei.
Side View of Alla Shay’s Eternal Flower Ring, 2018.
Eternal Flower Ring
Side View of Alla Shay’s Eternal Flower Ring, 2018.

This artwork was covered in Stars of Netflix's Bling Empire Talk High Jewelry and Boucheron. We liked this work so much because of the expert manner in which it bridges a gap between the worlds of fine art and high fashion.

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SOTHEBY'S. © BIZZY ARNOTT.
Sotheby's New Bond Street flag.
Sotheby's Flag
Sotheby's New Bond Street flag.

This flag was featured as the final image in the story Shredded Banksy Sells Again & Sets a $25.4 Million Record. We appreciated Sotheby’s fun nod to the iconic moment that transformed Banksy’s Girl with Balloon into the anti-artwork Love is in the Bin.

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PHOTO BY YUSUKE MIYAZAKI. © YAYOI KUSAMA 2021.
PHOTO BY YUSUKE MIYAZAKI. © YAYOI KUSAMA 2021. Kusama in Flower Obsession.
"Flower Obsession"
Yayoi Kusama in Flower Obsession.

This still image of Kusama from Flower Obsession was featured in the story, KUSAMA: Cosmic Nature at the NYBG & What She Really Thinks of NYC. As was observed by the author, “many of the works in the exhibition seem to simultaneously radiate optimism and obliteration.” The team was left particularly fascinated by the sheer force with which Kusama does just that in this still image.

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INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART, BOSTON. © THE ESTATE OF ALICE NEEL.
Alice Neel, Margaret Evans Pregnant, 1978. Oil on canvas. 57 3/4 × 38 1/2 in.
"Margaret Evans Pregnant"
Alice Neel, Margaret Evans Pregnant, 1978. Oil on canvas. 57 3/4 × 38 1/2 in.

This painting was featured in The Met Presents Alice Neel: People Come First. We liked Margaret Evans Pregnant so much because of the beautiful way in which it casually captures the female nude, motherhood, and true feminism. And, as always, Neel’s use of color is breathtaking.

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© PIXY LIAO.
Pixy Liao, Red Nails, from the For Your Eyes Only series, 2014.
"Red Nails"
Pixy Liao, Red Nails, from the For Your Eyes Only series, 2014.

This photograph was covered in the review, Pixy Liao: Your Gaze Belongs to Me at Fotografiska. The team found Red Nails particularly memorable because Liao was reportedly hesitant to include it in her portfolio, afraid it might offend reviewers.

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COURTESY THE ARTIST AND DESERT X. PHOTOGRAPHY BY LANCE GERBER.
Desert X installation view of Nicholas Galanin, Never Forget. 2021.
"Never Forget"
Installation view of Nicholas Galanin, Never Forget, 2021.

This striking artwork by indigenous artist Nicholas Galanin was covered in the story Desert X Spotlights Social Issues as Saudi Scandal Still Looms. The simple commentary of this play on the Hollywoodland sign (now Hollywood), which was created in 1923 to promote a whites-only housing development, is not easy to forget.