Art & Object Events

THRU: February 19, 2018
Los Angeles County Museum of Art

This exhibition engages 16 U.S.

THRU: February 19, 2018

"In 1917 John G. Johnson, the most famous lawyer of his day, left his astonishing trove of European art to the city of Philadelphia. One hundred years later, we’re taking a new look at one of this country’s most remarkable collections.

THRU: February 25, 2018
The Art Institute of Chicago

Color has occupied intriguing, if at times understated roles, in the history of architecture and design.

THRU: February 25, 2018
Denver Art Museum

Punctuating the DAM's upcoming North Building revitalization project, Then, Now, Next: Evolution of an Architectural Icon is an exhibition on the renowned modernist building, its history, and its future.

THRU: February 25, 2018
The Metropolitan Museum of Art

For nearly 60 years, David Hockney (British, born 1937) has pursued a singular career with a love for painting and its intrinsic challenges.

THRU: February 25, 2018
Pace Palo Alto

Pace Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of new sculptures and paintings by Kohei Nawa, marking his first solo exhibition in the United States and his second with the gallery.

THRU: March 3, 2018
Pace Gallery

Pace Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of works by Louise Nevelson, marking the gallery’s twenty-seventh solo show for the artist since 1963.

THRU: March 4, 2018
The Art Institute of Chicago

This special installation—the centerpiece of the Art Institute of Chicago’s celebration of the 70th anniversary of India’s independence—presents eight large triptychs from the Indian Civilization series by M. F. Husain (1915–2011).

THRU: March 4, 2018
Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago

Based in Chicago, Iraqi-American artist Michael Rakowitz (b. 1973) makes work that explores recent contested social, political, and cultural histories.

THRU: March 4, 2018
Detroit Institute of Art

This intimate exhibition focuses on an important painting in the DIA collection—Claude Monet’s Rounded Flower Bed (Corbeille de fleurs) from 1876, formerly known as Gladioli and recently retitled based on new research. Monet created this work during his residency in the Paris su