Studio  October 29, 2020  Chandra Noyes

Prints and Their Makers

Created: Thu, 10/29/2020 - 23:59
Author: chandra

The fine art and craft of printmaking is an artform so ubiquitous we often take it for granted. From the screen-printed shirts we wear every day to the leaflets and posters we see on telephone poles and billboards, the omnipresence of images in our world owes a huge debt to printmaking. Humans began making stamped images in the first century, and by seventh-century China, we were printing with ink on paper. Our drive to document our lives and share our stories is an innately human urge, and printmaking has developed as an incredible tool towards that end.

From this almost primitive need to leave our mark, printmaking has evolved into a multi-faceted artform encompassing a wide variety of processes, materials, and outcomes. A new book from Princeton Architectural Press, Prints and Their Makers, by Phil Sanders, delves into all that is possible in printmaking. Reviewing relief, intaglio, photogravure, lithography, and other methods, Sanders explains the hows and whys of each form or printmaking, using beautiful examples from the best artists and printmakers working today.

While painting and sculpture often take primacy in the fine arts world, the complex and sometimes mysterious processes of printmaking offer artists new ways to express themselves outside of their regular studio practice. Working with skilled craftspeople and their studios, printshops enable artists to realize their visions in a new way, one that can often be made multiple times over and may thus be more accessible to a wider audience. Master printmakers often go uncredited, and this book gives them a chance to shine, highlighting all that is possible through their expertise and creative problem-solving.

Julie Mehretu multi-colored abstract print

Julie Mehretu, Six Bardos: Hymn (Behind the Sun), 2018

Twenty-five-color aquatint, inked à la poupée with color blending, edition of 45, published by and printed at Gemini G.E.L. LLC, printed by Case Hudson, Amy Jo Toucey, Oliver Dewey-Gartner, Isaac Osher, Isabelle Beausang, and Brittany Fields

Tom McGrath print of eyes seen in a rearview mirror of a car

Tom McGrath, Untitled, 2015

Photogravure and sugar-lift, edition of 9, published by and printed at Flying Horse Editions-UCF, printed by Adrian Gonzalez

Claire Sherman print of sticks on the ground in bright colors

Claire Sherman, Underbrush, 2018

Nine-color lithograph printed from nine aluminum plates drawn and painted using toner and acrylic washes, edition of 30, published by and printed at Shark’s Ink, printed by Bud Shark and Evan Colbert

Katia Santibañez and James Siena print

Katia Santibañez and James Siena, Forehand Choker, 2018

Reduction woodcut in seven colors, edition of 22, published by Shore Publishing, printed by Mae Shore

Senzo Shebango print of a man in a jacket in front of two red framed panels

Senzo Shebango, They Took Everything, 2012

Five-color linocut, edition of 20, published by David Krut Projects, printed at David Krut Workshop by Mlungisi Kongisa

Tauba Auerbach colorful geometric print

Tauba Auerbach, Fold / Slice Topo I, 2011

Two-plate, multiple-color aquatint inked à la poupée, edition of 35, published by Paulson Bott Press, printed at Paulson Fontaine Press by Renée Bott, Pam Paulson, and Sam Carr-Prindle

James Siena geometric print in shades of blue

James Siena, Feedback Loop Resonator, fifth version (III), 2018

Watercolor monoprint with embossment on handmade Twinrocker paper, unique impression, published by and printed at Flying Horse Editions-UCF, printed by Phil Sanders and Adrian Gonzalez, assisted by Evan Rosato

Tomory Dodge screenprint of an iceberg and its reflection in the water

Tomory Dodge, Iceberg III, 2006

Multicolor screenprint from series of three images, edition of 35, published by CRG Gallery and printed at Axelle Editions by Luther Davis