Howard Halle

Spread over two capacious floors, the exhibit is Eisenman’s first presentation of new paintings in New York City after a seven-year hiatus in which their sculpture, fresh examples of which are also…
Live fast, die young, and leave a beautiful corpse: That’s often been the ticket to artistic immortality, even while coming at considerable cost. Such was the case for Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960–1988…
An interior view of Matisse’s atelier in the Parisian suburb of Issy-les-Moulineaux, "The Red Studio" (1911) serves as the centerpiece for an impressive feat of scholarship that gathers photographs,…
Silenced by the pandemic last year, The Whitney Biennial returns with an exhibition appropriately named Quiet as It’s Kept. The title seems intended to acknowledge an art world suffering from its own…
Andy Warhol grew up skinny and badly-complected, but more pertinently Catholic and gay (conditions noticeably conjoined in art history) at a time when being either wasn’t welcome in mainstream…
The New Museum’s retrospective of Faith Ringgold seems especially timely. The exhibition reveals how Ringgold’s work sees race not only as a matter of identity politics, but also as foundational to U…
Provenance reveals the lives of collectors and the fortunes and fates that cling to the object like so many layers of dust. Such is the premise for this exhibition in which artist and author de Waal…
Besides a play on her name that’s a little on the nose, Gillian Wearing: Wearing Masks also represents the first North American retrospective of the British conceptualist and Turner prize recipient’s…