At Large  August 16, 2021  Jeremy Howell

Art & Object Turns 4

Wikicommons

Gustave Caillebotte, Rue de Paris, temps de pluie, oil on canvas, 1877. 

On August 02, 2017 the very first piece of content went up on ArtandObject.com. It was a page simply titled “Picasso” with an embedded YouTube video about Christie’s upcoming sale of Picasso’s Femme assise, robe bleue. If you’re interested, you can see the page, unchanged from when I posted it, here. On August 15, after a couple more articles were posted, the Art & Object website went live.

Looking back at how few visitors were coming to the website in those first few weeks compared to the millions we now reach every year is quite humorous. And yet, I vividly recall the excitement I felt as I watched our pageviews grow from ten a week to a hundred to a thousand to ten thousand and beyond. 

In our digital world, it is easy to look at data points and forget that there are real people behind them. I consider it a privilege and an honor that so many people choose to spend their valuable time with Art & Object. Readers often email me with questions, compliments, and occasional gripes. I almost always close my email, regardless of the sender’s message, with the same salutation. On behalf of the Art & Object team, to all who have come to our site…

Thank you for your readership!

About the Author

Jeremy Howell

Jeremy Howell is the Co-Creator and Editor-In-Chief of Art & Object.

Subscribe to our free e-letter!

Webform

Latest News

The French Art Salon: Evolution & Impact
The word salon has a rich history of its own and was even used to indicate…
At Museo Ninfeo Visitors Walk Through Ruins of Luxury Roman Garden
Roman ruins are not normally found in the buildings of insurance companies. Yet…
Why People Hate Paul Gauguin
Many modern audiences, upon learning about the intricacies of Paul Gauguin’s…
Mauricio Lasansky's "Nazi Drawings" Return to Museums
A collection of drawings by Jewish Argentinian-American artist Mauricio…
“A Female Gaze” Captures 7 Decades of Street Photography by Women
Street photography—the thoroughly unpredictable and often magical framing of a…