Gallery  April 3, 2019  Chandra Noyes

Galleries Celebrate Influential Modern Japanese Art in "Parergon"

Taka Nonaka-Hill

Nonaka-Hill Gallery

A multi-part ongoing exhibition is reexposing Americans to an influential period of modern Japanese art. Nonaka-Hill and Blum & Poe, both in Los Angeles, are mid-way through a comprehensive three-part exhibition series bringing pivotal Japanese art to America. Parergon: Japanese Art of the 1980s and 1990s showcases the work of more than 25 visual artists, including photography, painting, sculpture, and performance.

Taka Nonaka-Hill

Installation view of Parergon: Japanese Art of the 1980s and 1990s, including Kazuo Kadonaga's Bamboo No.2 BW (1984, floor), and Kazumi Nakamura's Sanctuary in Daquake (1985, right)

The exhibition takes its names from the Gallery Parergon in Tokyo, which was home to many New Wave visual artists in the early 1980s. Japan in this time period was still experiencing immense post-war economic growth and corresponding social change, which abruptly ended in the mid-1990s with the onset of a major recession. Artists of this era were experimenting with new media, offering social critique and satire, and working in newly formed collectives. Their practices would have a profound influence on later contemporary Japanese art superstars like Takashi Murakami and Yoshitomo Nara.

Taka Nonaka-Hill

Naoya Hatakeyama, Underground / Water series, 1999

The exhibitions are curated by Mika Yoshitake, an expert in Japanese art and the curator of the recent traveling blockbuster exhibition, Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors (2017-19).

One of the three exhibitions comprising Parergon: Japanese Art of the 1980s and 1990s is open at Nonaka-Hill through April 6, with the third and final exhibition opening at Blum & Poe also on April 6. Accompanying public programming includes an artist roundtable with Kenjiro Okazaki, Yukinori Yanagi, Kenji Yanobe, and curator Mika Yoshitake on April 7, and live performances.

Taka Nonaka-Hill

Installation view of Parergon: Japanese Art of the 1980s and 1990s, including Kazumi Nakamura's KAIKOMA I, (1979, left) and Yukie Ishikawa's Red Brothers (1995, right)

About the Author

Chandra Noyes

Chandra Noyes is Managing Editor for Art & Object.

Subscribe to our free e-letter!

Webform

Latest News

5,000 Year Old Sword Discovered Hiding in Plain Sight
It’s the kind of discovery that those who haunt museums and libraries dream of…
7 Great Works of Art from Troubled Times
Throughout history, cultures and artists have faced upheavals and catastrophes…
How Afghanistan's carpets show the history of a country under siege
The current perception that Afghanistan has always been a war-torn backwater…
Transcendence: 10 Ancient Buddhist Sculptures

The story of Buddhist art in China is the story of the nation itself.