Museum  June 5, 2018  Megan D Robinson

Jennifer Bornstein Explores Feminist Media-Making at SLAM

Photo courtesy of the artist © Jennifer Bornstein

Jennifer Bornstein, American, born 1970; “Blue Room”, 2014; oil based printing ink on linen; six panels, each: 66 × 43 inches, total dimensions: 126 x 117 inches

The St. Louis Art Museum’s latest exhibition in its popular contemporary artist series, Currents 115, showcases work by Jennifer Bornstein. Using a variety of media, including etchings, photogravures, photographs, prints and video, Bornstein examines how technological image production, the social and identity-shaping powers of the media and the women's movement intersect.

Courtesy of the artist; Gavin Brown’s enterprise, New York; greengrassi, London; and the LeRoy Neiman Center for Print Studies, Columbia University, New York © Jennifer Bornstein

Jennifer Bornstein, American, born 1970; “Night Pool”, 2018; etching; 8 x 10 inches

Her exhibition contains three discrete works: a group of etchings, photogravures, and photographs; a 1:1 scale relief print of the interior of a house in London; and a new video piece, which combines 16mm film and high-definition digital video. Her traditional intaglio prints vary in size and scale, and include rubbings of everyday objects. Bornstein created the 1:1 architectural prints with the help of a team of printmakers and students. Using blue ink in reference to blueprints, Bornstein printed the entire interior surface of the room, recording the architectural space of a house slated for demolition. Her video piece combines images of ephemera from the feminist movement, contrasting and comparing the different attitudes of the 1970’s, 80’s and 90’s. Like the work of early feminist artists, Bornstein’s work contains a strong autobiographical thread, documenting people she has met, places she has inhabited and history she has unearthed.

Photo courtesy of the artist © Jennifer Bornstein

Jennifer Bornstein, American, born 1970; “Blue Room”, 2014; oil based printing ink on linen; six panels, each: 66 × 43 inches, total dimensions: 126 x 117 inches

This free exhibition is on view in Gallery 255 at the St. Louis Art Museum through July 15. For more information, visit http://www.slam.org

About the Author

Megan D Robinson

Megan D Robinson writes for Art & Object and the Iowa Source.

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