At Large  August 8, 2017

Calder’s Use of Motion and Sound to be Explored in a New Whitney Exhibition, Calder: Hypermobility

In the early 1930s, Alexander Calder (1898–1976) invented an entirely new mode of art, the mobile—a kinetic form of sculpture in which carefully balanced components manifest their own unique systems of movement. These works operate in highly sophisticated ways, ranging from gentle rotations to uncanny gestures, and at times trigger unpredictable percussive sounds. In Calder's own words, "Just as one can compose colors, or forms, so one can compose motions.” Calder: Hypermobility, opening on June 9 at the Whitney Museum of American Art, focuses on the extraordinary breadth of motion achieved by Calder from the moment he turned to radical abstraction in 1930 and continuing throughout the subsequent decades of his career.

Latest News

Kay Nielsen’s Enchanted Vision
More than a century ago, Danish illustrator Kay Nielsen (1886–1957) created…
Female photographers who shaped the way we look at the world
This year’s summer exhibition at the New-York Historical Society presents more…
Tuscan Winery Toasts 30th Anniversary of Keith Haring's Last Mural
When Italian university student Piergiorgio Castellani booked his winter-break…
Legacy: Selections from the Gillett G. Griffin Collection
Gillett G. Griffin (1928-2016) was not only a respected curator, scholar and…
The Art History Babes: XL Art
Let’s talk about BIG ART. In this super-sized episode, Nat, Jen and Gin discuss…