Art & Object Events

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February 17, 2019August 25, 2019
Detroit Institute of Arts
The Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA) presents From Camelot to Kent State: Pop Art, 1960–1975, an exhibition that embraces the generation of artists known as Pop artists. In reaction to consumerism and popular mass media, these artists took inspiration from advertisements, logos, comic strips and television using new technologies of the time, working with master printers and publishers. The exhibition highlights many works acquired by the DIA in the 1960s, when the museum and donors were early supporters of this new style.
May 17, 2019September 1, 2019
Andy Warhol Museum
Kim Gordon: Lo-Fi Glamour, the artist’s first North American museum solo-exhibition, features painting, sculpture, a new series of figure drawings, and a commissioned score for Andy Warhol’s 1963–64 silent film Kiss.
April 11, 2019September 1, 2019
Skirlball Cultural Center
See the iconic images that amplified one of the most influential cultural movements of the 1960s: “Black Is Beautiful.” Featuring over forty photographs of black women and men with natural hair and clothes that reclaimed their African roots, Black Is Beautiful: The Photography of Kwame Brathwaite, organized by Aperture Foundation, New York, is the first-ever major exhibition dedicated to this key figure of the second Harlem Renaissance.
June 13, 2018September 8, 2019
Seattle Art Museum

As industrialization brought sweeping and dehumanizing changes to 19th-century England, a small group of artists reasserted the value of the handmade.

April 6, 2019September 8, 2019
Legion of Honor
Early Rubens focuses on what is arguably the artist’s most innovative period of production, from 1608 until about 1620. It was during these years that Rubens rose to the highest ranks of European painting. He did so through a series of social and artistic choices that laid the groundwork for his later international fame and established a visual style that would guide ambitious painters for generations to come. 
June 27, 2018September 30, 2019
ICA Boston

Focusing on the work of black women artists, We Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women, 1965–85 examines the political, social, cultural, and aesthetic priorities of women of color during the emergence of second-wave feminism.

March 31, 2019January 5, 2020
Autry Museum of the American West
For the past three decades, David Bradley (Minnesota Chippewa, born 1954) has been a recognized voice from Indian Country, confronting through his art questions of identity, self-determination, and self-representation, as well as definitions of “traditional” Indian art. Drawing influence from diverse sources such as Santa Fe–style painting of the 1930s–40s, Renaissance art, pop culture, advertising, and film, Bradley’s work is at once serious and fun, historical and contemporary.