Art & Object Events

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February 9, 2019May 5, 2019
Philadelphia Museum of Art
Long Light, the first museum survey devoted to American photographer David Lebe, examines his remarkable artistic range and experimentation over five decades, including his powerful representations of gay experience and living with AIDS. The exhibition comprises around 145 photographs created from 1969 to the present, drawn primarily from the museum’s collection.
May 1, 2019May 5, 2019
107 Grand Street in Soho
Equal parts punk rock spirit and accessible art market innovation, Superfine! brings a new look and location to its 2019 New York fair, leaving the Meatpacking and landing at 107 Grand Street in Soho from May 1-5. A transparent, approachable player in an often stuffy and opaque art market, Superfine! believes that buying art should be a simple process and that an art fair should be an enjoyable atmosphere where anyone who wants to collect art can do so.
February 5, 2019May 6, 2019
Tate Britain
This exhibition showcases some of the most impactful photographs captured over the last 60 years. It includes many of his iconic war photographs – including images from Vietnam, Northern Ireland and more recently Syria. But it also focuses on the work he did at home in England, recording scenes of poverty and working class life in London’s East End and the industrial north, as well as meditative landscapes of his beloved Somerset, where he lives.​
January 19, 2019May 12, 2019
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
The photographs of Graciela Iturbide not only bear witness to Mexican society but express an intense personal and poetic lyricism about her native country. One of the most influential photographers active in Latin America today, Iturbide captures everyday life and its cultures, rituals, and religions, while also raising questions about paradoxes and social injustice in Mexican society. Her photographs tell a visual story of Mexico since the late 1970s—a country in constant transition, defined by the coexistence of the historical and modern as a result of the culture’s rich amalgamation of cultures. For Iturbide, photography is a way of life and a way of seeing and understanding Mexico and its beauty, challenges, and contradictions.
January 25, 2019May 12, 2019
Chazen Museum of Art
Southern Rites, on view at the Chazen Museum of Art at the University of Wisconsin–Madison from Jan. 25-May 12, 2019, is a powerful and moving visual portrait of individuals struggling to confront longstanding issues of race and equality.
January 25, 2019May 12, 2019
Morgan Library and Museum
“In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit.” With these words the Oxford professor J.R.R. Tolkien ignited a fervid spark in generations of readers. From the children’s classic The Hobbit to the epic The Lord of the Rings, Tolkien’s adventurous tales of hobbits and elves, dwarves and wizards have introduced millions to the rich history of Middle-earth. Going beyond literature, Tolkien’s Middle-earth is a world complete with its own languages and histories. Tolkien: Maker of Middle-earth celebrates the man and his creation.
February 8, 2019May 12, 2019
Brooklyn Museum
Mexican artist Frida Kahlo’s unique and immediately recognizable style was an integral part of her identity. Kahlo came to define herself through her ethnicity, disability, and politics, all of which were at the heart of her work. Frida Kahlo: Appearances Can Be Deceiving is the largest U.S. exhibition in ten years devoted to the iconic painter and the first in the United States to display a collection of her clothing and other personal possessions, which were rediscovered and inventoried in 2004 after being locked away since Kahlo’s death, in 1954.
February 24, 2019May 12, 2019
The Barnes Foundation
On first seeing a photograph around 1840, the influential French painter Paul Delaroche proclaimed, “From today, painting is dead!” The story sounds far-fetched, but it captures the anxieties that surrounded the technology when it first emerged in the mid-19th century.
January 29, 2019May 19, 2019
Smart Museum of Art
Solidary & Solitary tells the history of art by African-American artists, with a particular emphasis on abstraction, from the 1940s to the present moment. That story is a complicated one, woven from the threads of debates about how to represent blackness, social struggle and change, and global migrations and diasporas.
February 14, 2019May 19, 2019
Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum
Legendary painter Sandro Botticelli transformed ancient stories of lust, betrayal, and violence into Renaissance parables. In 1894, Isabella Stewart Gardner bought the Story of Lucretia, bringing the first Botticelli to America. Heroines + Heroes reunites her iconic Lucretia with its companion Virginia from the Accademia Carrara, Bergamo, a pair of paintings conceived for the Vespucci family palace in Florence. Together with additional extraordinary loans from Europe and the United States, this exhibition invites you to explore Botticelli's revolutionary narratives, as he reinvented ancient Roman and early Christian heroines and heroes as Renaissance role models.