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In current times, we’re in need of change. The five exhibitions highlighted here offer formulas for renewal in surprisingly inventive ways.

Hastings Contemporary, a small museum in the south of England, is debuting a new, interactive way to virtually tour their currently closed galleries.
 
With the help of a two-wheeled robot named the Double, up to five people can ride along with the videoconferencing bot as it peruses the galleries. One participant guides the robot from home, and the whole group can join in a conversation about what they find on view.

What began with eight prints and one drawing currently encompasses about 200,000 pieces from all over the world across multiple genres, including millions of films and film stills. Here we dive into ten things you may not know about MoMA.
Hobby Lobby president Steve Green’s Museum of the Bible admits culpability in potentially owning stolen objects.
Art imitates life. But when ordinary life seems to be on hold, it’s time to imitate art.
A small Dutch museum is reporting that a precious Vincent van Gogh painting was stolen from their galleries in a raid overnight.

On March 25, the U.S. Senate unanimously passed the hotly contested $2 trillion stimulus plan, which includes provisions for arts organizations and museums, and the House of Representatives is expected to pass the bipartisan bill Friday. The move, however, is a bittersweet response for art and museum institutions, as funding levels are still far from what is needed to bail out museums suffering from COVID-19-related shutdowns.

It’s the kind of discovery that those who haunt museums and libraries dream of: a long-forgotten or over-looked object reveals itself to be something more valuable and meaningful than previously thought.
Throughout history, cultures and artists have faced upheavals and catastrophes and reflected them through their work. Here we look at seven great works of art created in uncertain times.
The current perception that Afghanistan has always been a war-torn backwater ignores the facts, including a rich history of craftsmanship as evidenced by the synonymous association of quality with an Afghan carpet.