March 2018 Blog Posts

The Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) announced today that Gérard and Dora Cognié have made a promised gift of their collection of global contemporary art comprising just over 400 works, all of which are ink painting related, the majority being Chinese ink paintings.
Phillips is pleased to announce that Jean-Michel Basquiat’s Flexible will be among the highlights of the New York Evening Sale of 20th Century & Contemporary Art on 17 May. Consigned directly from the artist’s estate, this sale marks the work’s first time ever being offered for sale, publicly or privately.  Estimated to sell in excess of $20 million, Flexible is the highest-value and largest work to ever have been offered from the Estate.

Featuring over 3000 artworks from 248 galleries, Art Basel Hong Kong opened this week with the $35 million sale of Willem de Kooning’s Untitled XII (1975). Given that all other major first day sales were male artists, the status quo could use some shaking up, especially in Women’s History Month. Enter the indomitable Guerrilla Girls, feminist art activists based in New York. Known for their signature blend of humor, hard facts and bold graphics, the Guerrilla Girls have been fighting for gender and racial equality in the art world since 1985.

Who was Anthony van Dyck? Why was he so adored by King Charles I? Our Artistic Director Tim Marlow explores his life and work in this short introduction. See these paintings alongside works by Titian, Rubens, Holbein, Dürer and many others in 'Charles I: King and Collector'.

The Museum of Fine Arts Houston installed and unveiled their new gleaming Anish Kapoor sculpture this week. "Cloud Column," conceived in the late 1990s and executed in 2006, is a 21,000-pound stainless steel vertical oblong. Situated in front of the future Glassell School of Art, the piece will be a focal point for the Museum’s newly redeveloped campus, set to open in May.

The installation sparked mockery from the Chicago Tribune. In the coming decades, Houston is predicted to overtake Chicago as the nation's 4th largest city.

Cutting-edge artwork created at Burning Man, the annual desert gathering that is one of the most influential events in contemporary art and culture, will be exhibited in the nation’s capital for the first time this spring. “No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man” will take over the entire Renwick Gallery building, exploring the maker culture, ethos, principles and creative spirit of Burning Man. Several artists will debut new works in the exhibition.

Filmed in her Hackney studio, Natasha Kerr reveals how her mother's casual gift of a box of family photographs led to her reinventing herself as a unique kind of biographical textile artist. She now creates mixed media works on fine linen bedsheets involving painting, sewing, found photographs and other ephemera. Her art explores the power of memory and personal history to create extraordinary modern family heirlooms.

There’s a reason almost every column has the same leaves…

 In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards explores why columns look the way they do — in particular, the leave-strewn Corinthian columns you’ll often see on buildings (both old and new).

These leaves actually have an originating myth courtesy of the writer Vitruvius, crediting Callimachus for the Corinthian column design. The acanthus leaves on the column have remained consistent over millennia, and, over time, have come to represent more than just a sturdy plant.

The starting point for Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker’s "Work/Travail/Arbeid" is a simple question: Can choreography be performed in the form of an exhibition? In this new short film by David Terry Fine, dancer/choreographer Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker reveals new insights into the complex conceptual, technical, and physical labor that is essential to the practice of dance.

An iconic image from American pop artist Roy Lichtenstein is projected to bring as much as $500,000 in Heritage Auctions' Modern & Contemporary Art – Prints & Multiples Auction April 17 in Dallas.